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Michael STAVY, Renewable Energy Technology and Economics
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Michael STAVY'S Background, CV (Résumé) and Abstract List
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Michael STAVY'S Contact Information
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The Beighley-Stavy Home in Georgetown, CO
When in Chicago, ride the CTA

Innovations in Energy Efficient City Transit
Yes We Can!

The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement
Honorary Member, Class of '62, Niles TWP HS

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Chicago, IL

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SPECIALIZATIONS

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Buying Electricity and Natural Gas in Illinois' Competitive Energy Market
I help Propery Owners Develop their Wind Assets

Developing Large (> 1 MW) Wind Projects
Yes, We Can!

Consulting on Climate Change Mitigation, the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, Carbon Trading and the Carbon Tax
Heat energy not electricity

Developing Solar Thermal Projects
electricity

Developing PV (Photovoltaic) Projects
Fuel Cell Vehicle

Purchasing Hybrid, Electric, Natural Gas, Hydrogen and Alternative Fuel Vehicles
generate electricity and heat

Developing Microturbine & Distributed Generation Projects

ABSTRACTS FOR ALL PUBLISHED PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS

31 Papers/Presentations and Counting

Abstracts of Michael STAVY'S Published Papers and Presentations
see my co-authors

My August 2002 JSEE Paper is Specifically Cited in 11 Papers

PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS

My Papers on Climate Change

Michael's GHG Emissions Papers Will Help You Understand Climate Change and the Paris Climate Agreement
Nice Seeing you at SPI13

PAPER at Solar Power International 2013, 21-24 October, Chicago
Warsaw, Poland

Paper at the 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, 20-23 April, Warsaw Poland
Nice meeting with you in Marseille

PRESENTATION at the EWEC 2009 Marseille, France 16 - 19 March 2009
Download my Carbon Cap Presentation

Paper at the 2009 Michigan Wind Conference 3-4 March 2009, Cobo Hall, Detroit, MI
See you in Chicago

WINDPOWER 2009, May 4-7, Chicago, IL USA


Press for the CHICAGO EDITION of my 2009 EWEC Paper
día bueno

PRESENTATION at the 2008 Latin American Wind Energy Conference, November 5-7, Guadalajara, MX
CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2

PRESENTATION at WINDPOWER 2008, June 1-4, Houston, TX
CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2

PRESENTATION at the 2008 European Wind Energy Conference, 31 March-3 April, Brussels. Belgium
Nice seeing you in LA

PAPER, "The Economics of Storing Wind Electricity as Hydrogen" at WindPower 2007 June 3-6 Los Angeles, CA USA
Kellogg Graduate School of Management Class of 1969

QUOTED in the Northwestern Alumni Magazine, Winter, 2007
Storing Wind Electricity as Hydrogen

PAPER "The Technology of Storing Wind Electrcity as Hydrogen" at the European Wind Energy Conference, 7-10 May, 2007, Milan, Italy
Storing Wind Electricity as Hydrogen

PAPER at the POWER GEN Renewable Energy and Fuels Conference, March 6-8, 2007, Las Vegas, NV
Spoke to Reporters

PRESENTATION "Reporting the Wind Story" At the Seminar "Reporting Energy Issues in the Midwest", Sponsored by the Foundation for American Communications, Urbana, IL September 14, 2006
Spark, November 2005

Letter to the Editor of SPARK, November, 2005
Clear Creek Public Radio

"US Energy Sources and Uses" October 29, 2005 Interview on KYGT, Clear Creek County, CO Public Radio
Illinois’ Voluntary Renewable Portfolio Standard

MY 2005 COMMENTS to Illinois Commerce Commision Concerning lllinois' Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS)
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

MY ANSWERS to Certain Questions Concerning Illinois' 2005 RPS (Renewable Portfolio Standard)
Yak Yak Yak

My 4 October 2005 Speech to the Sierra Club, Chicago Group, North Shore Program
Quoted Comments

COMMENTS Quoted in Newspapers or Magazines
Chicago Skyline

PUBLISHED "January 3, 2005 Letter to the Editor" in Crain's Chicago Business
Journal of Solar Energy Engineering

PAPER "Carbon Content of Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel" in the February, 2005 Journal of Solar Energy Engineering
The Cost of Wind Electricity

PAPER "Worksheet to Compute the Cost Wind Electricity", World Renewable Energy Conference-VIII, Denver, CO USA, August 29-September 3, 2004
Fuel Cell Vehicle

PAPER California Climate Change Center's First Annual Conference on Climate Change, June 9-10, 2004, Sacramento, CA
Fuel Cell Vehicle

PAPER, National Hydrogen Association 20O4 Convention, April 26-30, 2004, Los Angeles, CA
Paper on Kyoto Protocol

PAPER-Global WINDPOWER 2004 Conference, Chicago, IL USA, 28-31 March 2004
Levelized Cost and Carbon Content of Hydrogen Vehicle Fuel

PAPER-United States Association for Energy Economics-NCAC-Washington, DC, Friday, December 19, 2003
Fuel Cell Vehicle

PAPER-Illinois Economics Association's 33rd Annual Meeting, October 17-18, 2003, Chicago, IL
Fuel Cell Vehicle

PAPER-American Solar Energy Society's SOLAR 2003 Conference, June 21-23, 2003, Austin,TX
Yak Yak Yak

PAPER-International Solar Energy Society-SOLAR WORLD CONFERENCE 2003-14-19 June 2003,Goteborg, Sweden
Pure Hydrogen Flame

PAPER-European Wind Energy Association-2003 EUROPEAN WIND ENERGY CONFERENCE 16-20 June 2003-Madrid,Spain
Journal of Solar Energy Engineering

PAPER "Worksheet to compute the Levelized Cost of PV electricity", Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, August 2002
From Paris on Route N-7

PAPER 2002 Global WindPower Conference


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  Paper at the 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, 20-23 April, Warsaw Poland

Michael STAVY  
Renewable Energy Technology and Economics  
312-321-1733  
300 N STATE ST APT 4434  
Chicago, Illinois USA 60654  

michael@michaelstavy.com  




EWEC.2010.jpg 

I made it to Warsaw on time. The 2010 volcano in Iceland did not stop me. I rented one of the last cars in Paris.

I made a poster presentation of my paper, The Effect That a US Signature on a Kyoto-II Climate Change Mitigation Treaty (or an Equivalent US Domestic Climate Change Mitigation Policy) Will Have on the US Wind Industry, at the 2010 European Wind Energy Conference 20-23 April, Warsaw, Poland. This is a revised title (See Below). My paper was originally titled The effect of COP 15 (Copenhagen 2009) on the US Wind Industry.  The original title would have made for a brief paper. 

My paper is number PO #40 and is listed in the Poster Topic: "Carbon Prices, Emissions Trading other climate Change Policies and Investment Decisions".


The cost of generating renewable electricity from wind, PV, solar thermal does not increase once it is installed. Demand and market forces as well as the cost of generation determine the market price of renewable electricity. This is because most of the cost is fixed and the fuel is free.  My analysis, The Cost of Solar Electricity from Abengoa's Arizona CSP Plant with Storage, based on The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) article, Rebecca Smith, Staff Reporter, Solar Plant to Generate Power After Sundown, December 31, 2010 is available for uploading below.

As I stated above, demand and market forces as well as the cost of generation determine the market price of renewable electricity. The market price of electricity (but not the cost of generation) can also go up with the general price level. This is called inflation. The Federal Reserve, by statute, has the job of controlling “monetary” inflation. The New York Times (NYT), Chicago print edition, on 3/24/11 published Lawrence Meyer’s Op/Ed Why Rising Food and Energy Prices are Not a Big Worry. Meyer, a former member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, has the position that the Fed should ignore increases in the food and energy price components of the overall Consumer Price Index (CPI) when setting inflation targets. Since I am an energy economist, I was quite interested in Meyer’s analysis of energy prices and their effective on the CPI. I was also interested in his view on the CPI’s ability to measure inflation (increases in the household cost of living expense).  I wrote my analysis of Meyer’s position, Why Rising Food and Energy Prices are a Big Worry.  Read my analysis to understand why I put “monetary” as an adjective, surrounded by parenthesis, in front of inflation. It is available for uploading below.

These open access documents are now available for downloading by using the link at the bottom of this page:

  1. Matthew R Simmons’ October 2000 White Paper, Revisiting The Limits of Growth: Could the Club of Rome have been Correct, After All?
  2. M Stavy, The Cost of Solar Electricity from Abengoa's Arizona CSP Plant with Storage, based on The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) article, Rebecca Smith, Staff Reporter, Solar Plant to Generate Power After Sundown, December 31, 2010
  3. M Stavy, Why Rising Food and Energy Prices are a Big Worry, My analysis of Lawrence Meyer's 3/24/11 NYT (Chicago print edition) Op/Ed article, Why Food and Energy Prices are Not a Big Worry.
  4. M Stavy, Paper, The Effect That a US Signature on a Kyoto-II Climate Change Mitigation Treaty (or an Equivalent US Domestic Climate Change Mitigation Policy) Will Have on the US Wind Industry, 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, 20-23 April, Warsaw, Poland
  5. M Stavy, Poster, The Effect That a US Signature on a Kyoto-II Climate Change Mitigation Treaty (or an Equivalent US Domestic Climate Change Mitigation Policy) Will Have on the US Wind Industry, 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, 20-23 April, Warsaw, Poland


More open access documents for you to download using the link at the bottom of this page.

I am also giving open access to my 2008 Latin Mexican Wind Conference presentation, The Use of the Kyoto Protocol and its Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to Help Finance Wind Plants in Latin American Countries, and my 2009 Michigan Wind Energy Conference presentation, A Mandatory US Federal Carbon Emissions Program (Kyoto-II) Will Reduce the Cost Advantage that Michigan Fossil Electricity has over Michigan Wind Electricity.  This will allow you to increase your understanding of the UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol.


Different Versions of the Abstract for EWEC 2010 Paper 

Current Abstract—Revised because of the events at COP15 in Copenhagen

 

A US signature on a Kyoto-II Climate Change Mitigation Treaty (or an equivalent domestic policy) would expand the US wind industry because wind electricity has no carbon content. COP 15 was expected to design an ambitious post-Kyoto climate change mitigation treaty (Kyoto-II). These expectations were not meet. President Obama and the Democratic majority in Congress were not able to help establish a federal cap and trade scheme and to then help create Kyoto-II. There was strong Congressional opposition from Democrats representing fossil fuel states and from the Republican Party representing the fossil fuel industry. On the other hand, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently declared carbon to be a controlled pollutant. A US climate change mitigation policy will add the cost of carbon emissions to the cost of US fossil electricity and will mandate better utility industry arrangements for wind. One US state (California) is directly capping its carbon emissions.  Ten states under a multistate emissions bubble (RGGI) use cap and trade to reduce the carbon intensity of electricity. 41 states use a renewable electricity standard (RES) to specify the % of electricity that must be renewable. A federal RES has also been proposed. US grid operators are setting up generation attribution data bases for use in US mitigation mandates. US entrepreneurs have set up voluntary carbon offset programs and a voluntary cap and trade commodity market (CCX). The federal government has made wind an attractive tax shelter to increase investment. Voluntary programs, state RES, carbon cap programs and tax shelters are not a substitute for a direct federal program to mitigate climate change. Nevertheless, state RES and federal tax shelters have been helpful in expanding the US wind industry.  Given the power of the US fossil fuel lobby, wind electricity may become 20% of the US grid in 2030, but it is still very uncertain if the necessary US federal climate mitigation policy can be established in time to avoid serious environmental damage to our planet.

 

dated: 7 April 2010

 


The Original Title and Abstract for the Paper

 

This is the 9th paper in my series of papers involving climate change mitigation and wind. My first paper was presented in 2000. You can get a complete list of my climate change papers at; http://www.nvo.com/stavy/accountingforghg/   

 

Based on my previous papers, the original title for this paper was The Effect of COP 15 (Copenhagen) on the US Wind Industry. In the paper abstract, I wrote “that President Obama and the Democratic majority in the US Congress have pledged that the US will help to establish and then join the Copenhagen (Kyoto-II) Protocol. This paper would describe the US climate change mitigation scheme under the Copenhagen Protocol and its effect on the growth of the US wind industry”. 

 

Dated: 3 April 2010

 


Original Summary of my Work

 

COP 15 is expected to design an ambitious post-Kyoto (2013) climate change mitigation agreement (Copenhagen Protocol). President Obama and the Democratic majority in Congress have pledged that the US will help to establish and then join the Copenhagen Protocol. An ambitious US climate change mitigation scheme will both add the cost of carbon emissions to the cost of generating US fossil electricity and mandate (RES) wind be a certain % of the US gird’s electricity. This paper describes the US climate change mitigation scheme under the Copenhagen Protocol and its effect on the growth of the US wind industry.

 

dated: 7 October 2009


Original Full Description

 

Expanding US industrial employment and a US climate change (carbon) mitigation scheme under the Copenhagen Protocol are the two major drivers that will expand the US wind industry. Increasing national energy security and reducing the US balance of trade deficit are not major wind industry drivers because very little oil is used to fuel US power plants. At the time that this abstract was written, both the Copenhagen Protocol design and the US carbon mitigation scheme architecture under the Copenhagen Protocol were not known. The paper will be written when the Copenhagen Protocol design and the US carbon mitigation scheme architecture become known. First, this paper presents an overview of the Copenhagen Protocol. The author expects that the Copenhagen Protocol will have a global carbon cap (ceiling), assigned national caps, base year from which emission reductions are measured, compliance year by which the emission reduction cap must be reached, timetables, monitoring, verification and compliance procedures and country lists (Annex I, non-Annex I, Annex B) to differentiate the treaty obligations of different countries under the Protocol. Second, the paper describes the US climate change mitigation scheme. The author expects that the US carbon mitigation scheme will use the cap and trade emission control architecture.  The architectural details include a standard emission allowance, offsets, carbon market organization, base year, compliance year, US national cap, economic sector caps, emitter compliance procedures and the initial allocation mechanism for allowances. Third, the paper concludes that the US cap and trade scheme expands the wind industry because it will reduce the relative cost advantage of fossil electricity. The author expects that this cost reduction will not be adequate to enable the wind industry to expand enough to reduce the US gird’s carbon content down to its assigned cap and to sufficiently expand US industrial employment. Until 2009, the US wind industry was doing quite well in the US. In 2009 the effects of the Great Recession hit the wind industry. In a EWEC 2008 paper, the author forecast that 2009 new installed capacity will be 28% less than 2008.  The US cap and trade scheme will require additional US power industry policies. The author suggests that these additional policies include greater transmission access for wind, a smart national electric grid with energy storage, a wind friendly grid operator, feed-in-tariffs, a 20% by 2030 federal renewable electricity standard (RES) and US tax incentives.

 

dated: 7 October 2009

 


 

Page revised but not completely undated:  20 May 2016 

 

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Black ink illustration of wind turbines located in Southern California along I-10, San Gorgonio Pass, between the San Bernardino Mountains on the north and the San Jacinto Mountains to the south (near Palm Springs, CA).  Painter: Christine BOIRY













Michael STAVY, Renewable Energy Technologies and Economics







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