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Robert P. Davis  
Gadshill  
(401) 273-9450  

gadshill@usa.net  







George Cruikshank and Colleagues
We're especially fond of the illustrations of George Cruikshank and of other witty and talented illustrators of the nineteenth century, such as the other Cruikshanks, Gillray, Robert Seymour, Alfred Crowquill, John Leech et al. We try to accumulate a representative sample of their work.

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6479
Cruikshank, George A Discovery Concerning Ghosts; with a Rap at the “Spirit-Rappers” Illustrated with Cuts. Dedicated to the “Ghost Club”. London. Frederick Arnold. 1863. Nine engravings by Cruikshank. First Edition. 48 pp. 8vo. In original blue paper wrappers. Entire pamphlet bound later into blue cloth covered boards, titled on spine in gilt. Recto of rear cover has “Notice to the Rapping Spirits and Their Mediums”. Verso of rear cover has a list of some Cruikshank publications. Refs: Cohn 209. R. Patten, George Cruikshank’s Life, Times, and Art, 2 Vols.Rutgers, 1996. Cruikshank’s skeptical view on the existence of ghosts, spirit writing and spirit rapping. He had become interested in spirit rapping and the vogue for seances about 1860, while working on a major work, The Worship of Bacchus. At this time– as at many others– Cruikshank lacked money and was given a loan by his friend, William Henry Merle, who told him of his personal experiences with seances (Patten, GC., Life, Times and Art, Vol 2, p. 406) and sent him an unpublished account of his experiences. These, reinforced by Cruikshank’s dislike of the American spiritualist D. D. Home, were incorporated into this pamphlet, a “rambling, punning, digressive text” (Patten, op. cit., p. 414). Slight soiling of blue wrappers and of outer (later) blue cloth covers. Leaves 29/30 and 31/32 partially uncut. Minor foxing of p.1 and rear wrap. Overall, Very Good.
Price: $450.00

11214
[Broadside]. Davies, J. B., P.M. (753).- The Song of a Sot. (Parody on Tom Hood’s Song of a Shirt). Words composed by Bro. J. B. Davies, P.M. (753). Dedicated to George Cruikshank, Esq., by his kind permission. London. J. B. Davies. N.D. [after 1842] Illustrated, probably by George Cruikshank. First Edition 1 p. 4to A humorous temperance broadside, a parody of Hood’s “Song of a Shirt” [1842-3]. Woodcut at top attributed to George Cruikshank. Crruikshank had, in other works, openly drawn on Hood’s verses for inspiration in his push for teetotalism in illustration and in verse. The text consists of ten 8-line verses, each consisting of rhyming quatrains, in double column, describing the downward path in life of an inveterate drunkard. A precursor of Cruikshank’s “The Bottle”. Attribution of vignette to George Cruikshank from old catalogue entry, originally laid down on face, where this item is also noted, as I have confirmed, as not listed in Frederick Marchmont’s “Three Cruikshanks” {1897] or in Douglas’s (sic!) work [? Jerrold] on Cruikshank. Not in Cohn. Quite rare and a fragile item. Quite consistent with Cruikshank’s notorious teetotalism in both writings and illustration, but unrecorded even in Robert Patten’s monumental “George Cruikshank: Life, Times & Art”. It is clear that Cruikshank wa s quite conversant with Hood’s work, particularly the model of Hood’s “Song of the Shirt”, for which he had done illustrations supportive of poor seamstresses and “A Drop of Gin”, for which he,like Kenny Meadows, was inspired to draw temperance illustrations. (Patten, op. cit., Vol.2, p.235). Few small stains and two old folds. Professionally deacidified, cleaned, rebacked with Japanese paper. At same time, an old catalogue entry removed from face and bookplate of Rowfant Club removed from old board backing on which this was laid down. Surface abraded where catalogue entry was laid down. Bookplate labeled as presented by William Orin Mathews. Both enclosed. Else, Very Good.
Price: $495.00

11224
Leech, John.- Portraits of Children of the Mobility. Drawn from Nature by J. Leech. With Memoirs and Characteristic Sketches by the Author of “The Comic English Grammar,” etc. London. Richard Bentley. 1841. Illustrated by 8 full page sketches by John Leech, done in lithographs from the artist’s pencil sketches.. First Edition. 47 pp. + 1 p. publisher’s ad. Fo. Reddish purple publisher’s cloth, blind embossed on covers and titled in gilt on front cver. Tissue guard protects frontispiece. Yellow end papers. John Leech (1817–64) was a noted English caricaturist and illustrator of Irish extraction in the mid-19th century. He was a friend of Thackeray and the painter, Millais. Largely self-taught, he contributed to Bentley’s Miscellany and to Punch, among other periodicals. The drawings here are sensitive ad sympathetic sketches of destitute London urchins at play and sport, with Leech’s satirical narrative as text. Text and illustrations are bright and clean in this very attractive (except for cover) copy of an uncommon work by the great illustrator of ”A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, “Comic History of Rome”, “Comic History of England”, etc. Bookseller’s tag (”Bain”) and attractive bookplate on front pastedown. Wear at corners and eds of spine. Fading of spine and covers. Foxing of tissue guard only. Rare spot on end papers. Else, Very Good, indeed.
Price: $395.00

11251
Hone, W[illiami] and Cruikshank, George.- Official Account of the Noble Lord’s Bite! And His Dangerous Condition, with Who Went to See Him, and What Was Said, Sung, and Done, on the Melancholy Occasion. Published for the Instruction and Edification of All Ranks and Conditions of Men. By the Author of Buonaparte-Phobia; or, Cursing Made Easy. London. W. Hone. 1817. Title page illustrated with woodcut vignette by George Cruikshank. First Edition. 15 pp. +1 p. catalogue of Hone’s publications at rear. 8vo. Self wraps. Cohn 614. Not in Marchant, Three Cruikshanks. Nor in Jerrold. A satirical attack on Lord Castlereagh (Robert Stewart, 1769–1822). Events in Stewart’s history are reviewed in allusions by the polemical writer and publisher, William Hone, and his frequent co-pamphleteer, the illustrator and caricaturist, George Cruikshank. Castlereagh’s history is, briefly, as follows: Irish-born, he was a supporter of William Pitt and the more reformist wing of British politics. From 1795–1800, concerned that Napoleon was enticing Ireland into a union with France, Stewart engineered the Irish Act of Union through both Parliaments. Deceived by George III and the British establishment, Castlereagh was under the belief that the Catholics would be emancipated. This did not occur and both Castlereagh and Pitt resigned, Stewart, however was held responsible for a long time for the betrayal of the Catholics. Pitt and Stewart returned to the Cabinet with the resumption of the Napoleonic War in 1804. Pitt died and fights broke out between Castlereagh and the Foreign Secretary Canning, with result that they fought a duel in 1809, with Canning being wounded. In 1812 Castlereagh became Foreign Secretary and negotiated the end of the Napoleonic War in the Treaty of Paris and the Congress of Vienna of 1814. He was helpful in his pro-European actions and forming a more effective collective security program. Dspite this great contribution to European peace and security he was severely criticised for supporting reactionary governments on the Continent and repressive ministers in Britain. In 1822, he developed gout, as well as paranoia and other signs of mental disturbance. Despite a suicide watch at home, he slit his own throat on 12 August 1822. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, near William Pitt. Suicide was illegal and radicals like Williqm Cobbett thought there had been a cover-up. Controversy and misunderstanding were hallmarks of Castlereagh’s life and, as noted by Patten, he never got a good press. Cruikshank’s image on the title page shows a bulldog biting the nose of Castlereagh. This pamphlet was at a relatively early stage of Cruikshank’s frequent collaboration in parody with Hone, who was at this time engaged in his political trial for blasphemy in parody of the litany, a history wonderfully chronicled in Robert Patten’s “Cruikshank’s Life, Times and Art”, Rutgers, 1992, Vol. 1, Ch. 9. Minor toning. Lower edge of pages 5/6 torn, without encroaching on text. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

11271
Cruikshank, George and William Hone.- [Pamphlet] The Political House that Jack Built. With Thirteen Cuts. London. William Hone. 1820. Thirteen illustrations by Cruikshank Fourty-fourth Edition (one year after First Edition). 24 pp. + testimonal ads for Hones’s work on verso of last page. 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Disbound from a collection. Cohn 663. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 158, 159; Life, I, pp. 157–68. A satirical verse illustrated by George Cruikshank parodying the nursery rhyme, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. Also digs at Wellington. The comic illustrations are grand. Each verse headed by a quotation from William Cowper. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank established himself "as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson." Perhaps the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, it sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). Toning of edge Very Good
Price: $325.00

11272
Cruikshank, George and William Hone.- [Pamphlet] The Man in the Moon &c, &c. &c.. A Speech from the Throne, to the Senate of Lunataria With Fifteen Cuts. Together with A Political Christmas Carol, Set to Music, to Be Chaunted or Sung thoughout the Kingdom and the Dominions beyond the Seas by All Persons thereunto Especially Moved. London. William Hone. 1820. Fifteen illustrations by Cruikshank. Eighteenth Edition (same year as First Edition). 16 pp., 8pp., unnumbered + testimonal ads for Hones’s work on verso of last page. 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Disbound from a collection. Cohn 527, 661. Patten, Life, I, pp. 157–68. Continuing his very successful work with William Hone, this satirical verse is illustrated by George Cruikshank, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. The main target here is the Prince Regent, to become King George IV. The comic illustrations are grand. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank continues to certify himself as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson. This work is a worthy successor to the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, “The Political House That Jack Built”, which sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte”.(quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). “Man in the Moon” contains shorter sections, “A Political Christmas Carol. Set to Music”, further satirizing the Prince Regent, and “The Doctor”, parodying George Canning, who had crawled his way to Speaker of Parliament through sycophancy , double-cross and inaction. Toning of edge and a few small spots of foxing on p.1. Very Good
Price: $325.00

11273
Cruikshank, George and William Hone.- [Pamphlet] The Queen’s Matrimonial Ladder, A National Toy, with Fourteen Step Scenes; and Illustrations in Verse, with Eighteen Other Cuts. By the Author of “The Political House That Jack Built”. London. William Hone. 1820. Eighteen illustrations by Cruikshank. Twenty-first Edition (same year as First Edition). 24 pp., unnumbered + ads for Hones’s publications on last leaf. 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Disbound from a collection. Cohn 680. Patten, Life, I, pp. 157–68. Continuing his very successful work with William Hone, this satirical verse is illustrated by George Cruikshank, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. The main target here is the Prince Regent, who became King George IV. The comic illustrations are grand. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank continues to certify himself as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson. This work is a worthy successor to the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, “The Political House That Jack Built”, which sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte”.(quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). This pamphlet is a verse parody of the Prince and the history of his dissolute life and then his marriage and the very public brouhaha he caused by his accusations of infidelity, etc. cast at the Queen. She was ultimately vindicated by a public commission and the effect of Hone’s and Cruikshank’s pamphlets. This pamphlet is venomous in its accusations against the Prince Regent and ultimate King. The copy cited in Cohnb is dated 1826. In the earliest edition of the pamphlet, a pasteboard folding ladder, with the stages of the affair labeled on progressive rungs up and down, was included with the pamphlet, The illusration on the front of the pamphlet shows the prototype (Patten , Life, I, p.178). Hone, in an apocryphal story, claims that an unnamed individual tried to bribe him not to publish this pamphlet. Patten (op.cit)expresses skepticism of the veracity of Hone’s story and writes vividly of this pamphlet while he reviews the history of the Queen Caroline affair and the Hone/Cruikshank role in this history (Life, I, 177–186). Toning of edge and a few spots of foxing. 1” lower corner of p. 9 torn off with no encroachment on text.Small perforation of page of ads. Else, Very Good
Price: $300.00

11110
Furniss, Harry (Henry).- My Bohemian Days. With Illustrations by the Author. London. Hurst & Blackett, Ltd. N.D. [1919]. About 110 illustrations by Furniss. Second Edition (so stated). 286 pp. 8vo. Blue publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. T.e.g. Henry Furniss (1854–1925) was an Irish born, English caricaturist and artist, whose work appeared in the Illustrated London News, Punch, and many other British periodicals. He was the illustrator of Lewis Carroll’s “Sylvie and Bruno” and its sequel, the works of Thackeray, and was a lifelong devotee of Charles Dickens. He illustrated Dickens’s novels in 1910. This volume is a memoir of Furniss’s adult acquaintances in the late Victorian and Edwardian period in London. It is full of numerous illustrations by Furniss of public figures, actors, political people (especially William Gladstone, for whom Furniss’s caricatures remain the living image of his figure), etc. Furniss moved to the United States about 1911, working there with Thomas Edison in the beginning film industry (1912–13), acting in film and, in 1914, developing the first animated cartoon film. He was a prolific author and illustrator. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Staining of covers.
Price: $50.00

8608
Seymour, Robert.- Seymour's Humorous Sketches Comprising Eighty-Six Caricature Etchings Illustrated in Prose and Verse by Alfred Crowquill. With a Descriptive List of the Plates and a Biographical Notice of Robert Seymour, including an Account of His Connexion with The Pickwick Papers by Henry G. Bohn. London. T. Miles and Co. N.D. [1866] 86 engravings from the original steel plates by Henry Wallis done from lithographs by Seymour. Third Edition. 173 pp. 4to. Red publisher's cloth illustrated in gilt and black on spine and front cover. Seymour, a popular artist-humorist of the early 19th century, was the initiator of the project which became "The Pickwick Papers" and which was so instrumental in launching the career of Charles Dickens as a novelist. Seymour published many series of sporting prints, the "Humorous Sketches", of which this volume is composed, being among his most popular when they were first issued as detached lithographic prints about 1834–1836 by Carlisle, the publisher of Thomas Paine's "Age of Reason." The stones were sold in 1836 to Henry Wallis, a noted engraver and picture dealer. Wallis transferred the drawings to steel with great skill and published them in 1838 with an associated text in prose and verse by Alfred Crowquill, himself a noted humorist and artist. A second edition of this was published in 1842 by Henry G. Bohn, who added a descriptive list of the plates. Because of the demand, this third edition, identical to the second and with illustrations from the original steel plates, was published in 1866. Bohn's introduction recounts the story of the origin of "The Pickwick Papers" from the point of view of both Seymour's wife (Seymour having famously committed suicide in 1836 before even the second of "Pickwick's" 20 parts was issued) and Dickens. Mrs. Seymour was angry at Dickens, blaming him for her husband's suicide and for her economic decline. It is generally held that Dickens, while ambitious and opinionated about the proposed publication, was innocent of Mrs. Seymour's charges. This volume displays Seymour's great talents well and is clearly a forerunner of Seymour's conception of what the adventures of the Nimrod (to be Pickwick) Club were to be like. Professionally rebacked with original spine laid down. New end papers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $350.00

11028
Anonymous [? Gabriel Alexander).- The First Step to Crime: or, The Bottle. Complete. Illustrated by [George] Cruikshank. New York. Burgess, Stringer & Co. 1848. Eight full page wood engravings, including frontispiece + engraved cover, by George Cruikshank. A few signed “E. Lloyd, London”. First American Edition. 84 pp. Publisher’s ads on reverse of cover.. 8vo. Green prnted and illustrated paper wraps. Stab-sewn. Double column text with full page plates. R. Patten, “George Cruikshank’s Life, Times and Art”, Vol II, pp.229–62. Not in Cohn. Probably a piracy, a short novel, illustrated after Cruikshank’s Hogarthian Temperance series, “the Bottle”, published in 1847, and its sequels. The narrative here is a history of a seemingly upstanding man, who, under the influence of friends takes to the bottle, and because of that enters a course of degeneracy, leading to loss of job, social standing, possessions, etc. ultimately to the death of his family members and to crime. It ends with his execution. The illustrations appear to be by E. Lloyd (not listed in Groce and Wallace), after Cruikshank’s on the same subject, as shown in Patten, Vol. II, pp. 239–42. Publication of “The Bottle” in 1847 led to a form of Bottle-mania with much imitation, transfer of the plate images to table-ware, tea sets lantern-slides, waxworks, cotton cloth and silk. “Gabriel Alexander turned “The Bottle’ pictures into a penny parts-issue novel” (Patten, II, p. 250), similar to this item. Whether this item is identical to Alexander’s cannot be confirmed. The text here is clearly English rather than American. Lloyd may have been the same person, who published a parody of Dickens’s “Pickwick Papers” as “Posthumous Papers of the Cadgers’ Club” in 1837 (see, James Cook, “Bibliography of the Writings of Charles Dickens with Many Curious.and Interesting Particulars Relating to His Work”, 1879, p. 82). Cruikshank’s preoccupation with temperance and “The Bottle’ contributed to the rupture of his friendship with Charles Dickens, whose views on temperance were moderate. Lacks rear cover and head of spine. Front cover repaired with archival tape on verso. Chips lost from edges of front cover without loss of text or image. Toning of text, worse at rear. Else, Good+.
Price: $175.00

10838
À Beckett, Gilbert Abbott (Editor).- George Cruikshank’s Table-Book. Illustrated with Twelve Steel Plates, and One Hundred and Sixteen Engravings on Wood by George Cruikshank. London. Bell and Daldy. 1869/ Illustrated. A New Edition. 277 pp. + 2 pp. publisher’s catalogue. Royal 8vo. Green publisher’s cloth. Embossed and gilt illustration and title on front cover and gilt titling on spine. Covers ruled in the blind. A.e.g. Brown end papers. Cohn 191 This production was first issued by “Punch” in 1845. it was issued in 12 monthly numbers (each with a “Table Book Advertiser”), later gathered into one volume. Earlier (1827–8) William Hone had issued a “Table Book” in two volumes, without illustrations by George Cruikshank (Cohn 403). The frontispiece of this volume, originally the wrapper illustration of the parts, appears to have been engraved by W. J. Linton, as on the original. The engravings, both on steel and on wood are of very high quality and interest.c. Mild wear at ends of spine and corners. A few stains on front cover. Else, Very Good.
Price: $195.00

10883
Doyle, Richard.- A Journal Kept by Richard Doyle in the Year 1840. Illustrated with Several Hundrd Sketches by the Author. With an Introduction by J. Hungerford Pollen and a Portrait. London. Smith, Elder, & Co. 1885. Frontispiece self-portrait laid on (with loose tissue guard) and numerous other illustrations on manuscript pages by lithography, all by Doyle. First Edition. 152 pp. 4to. Tan publisher’s cloth on beveled boards. Elaborate gilt titling and decoration in rustic style on spine and front cover. Illustrations on front cover in black, designed by Doyle. A.e.g. Black coated end papers. For Richard Doyle: Catholic Encyclopedia and Everitt, pp. 381–94. A remarkable production by Richard Doyle, called on cover and inner titles “Dick Doyle’s Journal”. His journal for the year 1840, printed in facsimile handwriting with numerous decorations, head pieces and tailpieces and illustrations by Doyle. A nice copy of a delightful book. Richard Doyle (1824–1883) was an English artist and caricaturist, a son of the artist and caricaturist, John Doyle, This journal, a manuscript book written and illustrated in pen and ink when the author was 16, is now in the British Museum.. This work, reproduce in facsimile in 1885, “is a remarkable proof of Richard Doyle’s precocity as an artist” (www.newadvent.org/cathen/05151c.htm). At age 19 he started work for “Punch”, and is noted for his drawing that became their cover of “Punch” to this day. A devout Catholic he left “Punch” in 1850 because of their anti-Catholic positions. Among his work in book illustration is Thackeray’s “The Newcomes”, etc. With a technique full of imagination and romantic fancy, he was noted for his draftsmanship, grace and amusement. Mild wear at ends of spine and corners. Mild soiling of covers. Gilding very bright. Front hinge starting internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

5855
[Forrester, Alfred Henry]. (pseudonym: Alfred Crowquill).- The Pictorial Grammar. London. William Tegg & Co. 1876. Illustrated also by Alfred Crowquill Later Edition. 75 pp. 16mo. Green publsher’s cloth spine and illustrated green paper covered boards DNB for Crowquill. Originally published about 1843. Alfred Henry Forrester (1806–72), in the family tradition, practiced with his brother as a notary. He wrote occasionally for magazines and soon began to illustrate his own works and those of others. He worked for Bentley’s Miscellany, the earliest Punch and the Illustrated London News. Initially, the pseudonym “Alfred Crowquill” was jointly used by A. H. Forrester and his brother, Charles Robert Forrester. After 1843. his brother retired and Alfred Henry used the name exclusively. His style included much parody and fantasy and he illustrated fairy tales for children. Among his many works are “A Comic Alphabet”, “Comic Latin Grammar” “The Travels and Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen” and “A Bundle of Crowquills”. this work is a comic illustration of grammar and parts of speech. Front hinge broken internally. Mild wear at ends of spine, edges and corners. Shaken. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

10710
Seymour, Robert (Illustrator), and Sheridan, Louisa Henrietta (Editor).- Comic Offering; or Ladies' Melange of Literary Mirth, for MDCCCXXXIII. London. Smith, Elder and Co. 1833. Refs.: Everitt, Engish Caricaturists (pp. 355–363) (for Meadows). NCBEL III, 1874. Profusely illustrated by Robert Seymour and a few by others. Several engravers. Engraved and printed title pages. First Edition. 347 pp. 12mo in 6's. Embossed ribbed publisher's cloth with gilt decoration and titling on spine. A.e.g. A variety of comic verse, essays and stories, presumably written for ladies, with numerous comic illustrations. Many of the illustrations are identified, by signature, initials or by style, as by Robert Seymour, best known as the original illustrator of "The Pickwick Papers". Especially good are the frontispiece and illustrated title pages, both by Seymour. Other contributors include I.[=Joseph] K[enney]. Meadows , George Cruikshank (with an ode to the artist by Alfred Crowquill [Alfred Henry Forrester]). Engravings often done by George Dorrington, a prominent artist and engraver of the 1830’s. The "Editor" (Louisa Henrietta Sheridan, d. 1841), not further identified, nor listed in Todd, reports this to be the third issue of her projected annual production which lasted for 5 consecutive years . She had been married to Sir Henry Wyatt in 1841, but died soon thereafter of tuberculosis, as noted in Gentleman’s Magazine. Besides the issues of “Comic Offering”, she was noted for her musical compositions and essays and was editor of “The Diadem, a Book for the Boudoir”. Numerous contemporary critics showed their anti-feminist bias in reviews of her comic annuals (see: Tamara L. Hunt, Victorian Periodicals Review, Vol. 29, No. 2, Summer 1996, pp. 95–115 for a discussion of Gender Issues and Humor in the early Victorian Period, especially Louisa Henrietta Sheridan and the critics).This volume is a nice copy of a fragile and very rare item, noted for the Seymour contribution. Bookplates and a catalogue listing laid down on pastedown and front free end paper. Hinges cracked internally. Small chips from spine ends. Corners bumped. Minimal foxing and soiling. Shaken. illustrations Near Fine, with tissue guards. Else, Good to Very Good.
Price: $550.00

10717
[Cruikshank, George]. Anonymous.- Four Rare Etchings by the Celebrated George Cruikshank, Drawn and Etched for O’Neill’s “Blessings of Temperance”, with Letter-Press Showing from Whence Came Those Famous Works of the Artist, - “The Bottle,” The Drunkard’s Children, “ & “Upas Tree.” London., Published at 50 Booksellers Row. 1876. 4 full-page plates by George Cruikshank. First Edition.. 4 pp. 8vo. Printer paper wraps with printed decorative border. Not in Cohn. DNB (for O’Neill). Patten, Cruikshank, II, 186, 232, 250 (for Cruikshank and O’Neill). John O’Neill (1777 ?–1860 ?) was an Irish temperance poet. He grew up in poverty and lived his life so. A son of a shoemaker, he followed that profession unsuccessfully, hampered by the costs of his very large family. His poems were popular, especially his 1840 “The Drunkard”. Befriended by George Cruikshank who famously illustrated O’Neill’s temperance poem beginning with the reissue of “The Drunksrd” in 1842. Later Cruikshank published “The Bottle” and a reissued “The Drunkard” as “Blessings of Temperance”. Cruikshank had been a confirmed drunkard himself, but had earlier explored temperance before meeting O’Neill. He “etched four surreal plates for the second edition of ‘The Drunkard’ in December 1841” (Patten, II, 186). Subsequently he became a confirmed teetotaller, but he denied that O’Neill’s poem inspired “The Bottle” (Patten, II, 232, 250).This uncommon pamphlet argues that “The Bottle” of Cruikshank was indeed indebted to O’Neill’s poem. The anonymous author, who reports himself as a friend of O’Neill, traces specific elements of the O’Neill poem through Cruikshank’s illustrations to specific elements of “The Bottle”. Toning of leading edge. Else, Very Good
Price: $210.00

10726
Cruikshank, George.- The Musical Bijou; Comprising the Popular Stories of The Fakenham Ghost; Elegy on Madam Blaize; & The House That Jack Built: &c., &c.; Set to Music by W. A. Nield. To Which Are Appended Two Rondings, by Steibert and Mozart. Adapted for Young Amateurs, and Illustrated by Cruikshank. London. Allan Bell and Co. and H. Washbourne 1836. Illustrated with small vignettes by George Cruikshank and/or Robert Cruikshank New Edition. [26 pp.] Oblong 4to. Illustrated yellowish printed paper wraps. Stapled. Cohn, Cruikshank, 601. Contains three songs for children’s voices accompanied by piano. Also has two pieces for solo piano. Originally issued in 1834 as part of the Juvenile Musical Library. Reissued in two parts of which this is one. Quite scarce. The original of the Fakenham Ghost (a donkey) was a ballad of 1806 by Robert Bloomfield, an early children’s book. The Elegy on Madam Blaize is by Oliver Goldsmith. The House That Jack Built is, of course, the traditional Mother Goose Poem, parodied by George Cruikshank in his devastating political satire. Covers soiled and hinge worn. Corner’s worn. One corner heavily moused with loss of end note of first line of last 2 pp. Illustrations undamaged. Bookseller stamp of Nash & Woodhouse of Richmond on front cover. Else, Good.
Price: $200.00

10734
Hone, William.- Facetiae and Miscellanies. With One Hundred and Twenty Engravings, Drawn by George Cruikshank. London. Published for William Hone by Hunt and Clark. 1827. Numerous illustrations by George Cruikshank. First Edition. 8vo. Tan paper spine with printed paper label. Blue paper covered boards. Cohn 405. (see also Cohn 400). A major production from William Hone, who collected 14 of his previously published seditious pamphlets, all illustrated by George Cruikshank, into a volume of “Facetiae”. The collection includes the “Political House That Jack Built”, “Non Mi Ricordo!” and other pamphlets on the Queen Charlotte Affair, several on Dr. Slop, etc. It has been a bibliographer’s nightmare, composed of various editions of Hone’s pamphlets. This copy of the erratic production, apparently in its original bound state, lacks “Bank Note” and the “Toy Ladder” (from “The Queen’s Matrimonial Ladder”). The Introduction bears the date of 1822, but in the Advertisement Hone apologized for the publication delay occasioned by his forgetting about the proof sheets. He declares that his purpose in publishing the collection was not to “revive” them, but to provide them “a decent funeral”: “I come to bury these, Sir, not to praise ‘em.” Hone and Cruikshank in title vignette.Grandly illustrated by George Cruikshank; some plates folded. Very scarce. Covers detached. Chips from spine, especially from lower end and hinges. Chips from edges of label Internally, Very Good.
Price: $2,500.00

10747
Hogarth, William.- The Works of William Hogarth. A Series of Engravings on Steel by the First Artists; with Descriptions, pointing out Their Beauty, and a Comment on Their Moral Tendency, by the Rev. J. Trusler: with Anecdotes of the Author and His Works, by R. Hogarth, J. Ireland, Nichols and Others. Each Number Will Contain Four Very Highly-Finished Steel Engravings, and Will Be Accompanied by Descriptve Letter-Press. An Incomplete Set. London, New York. E. T. Brain & Co./ Burgess Stringer and Co. N.D. [1843–48] The India Proofs Edition (comprising the first impressions from the Plates). About 80 pages of images and text. 4to. Individual parts, in blue printed paper wraps. Covers bordered and printed in red and black. Each part containing 4 plates and 4 pages of text. Approximately 10 Parts from the original set of 36 Parts issued every two weeks. Dated from the fact that Burgess, Stringer and Co. existed only 1843–48. Wonderful Hogarth images, engraved on steel. In crisp impressions on laid paper. The covers of the parts are in various conditions, some good + and some torn or chipped. A few issues have publisher’s brochures inserted. Very suitable for matting and framing to make a handsome and decorative set of Hogarth engravings. Only a selection of parts. Covers often disbound with chipped spines and edges. Plates with mild toning of edges, rare mark and very modest foxing of edges of a few. Protected with tissue guards. Most, Very Good or better. In such a selection of parts,not all text is appropriate to the plates.Overall Good +.
Price: $155.00

10751
Jerrold, Douglas, Kenny Meadows, et al.- Heads of the People; or, Portraits of the English Selected from the Crowd. Drawn by Kenny Meadows and Described by Douglas Jerrold, W. M. Thackeray, William Howitt, Samuel Lover, Nimrod, Whitehead, Mr. & Mrs. S. C. Hall, Mrs. Gore, R. B. Peake, R. H. Horne, etc. London. Willoughby & Co. and W. Tegg & Co. N.D. [ca. 1855–60]. With Twenty-Four Engravings. by Meadows. First Edition. 192 pp. + 3 pp. publisher’s ads at front and rear. each. 12mo. Green illustrated paper covered boards. itled in black on paper covered spine. Everitt, Engish Caricaturists (pp. 355–363) (for Meadows). A series of comic caricatures of typical English persons and professions, each written by a popular English author of the day, such as Douglas Jerrold (1803–57), Thackeray (1811–63), Mrs. Gore (1799–1861). Samuel Lover (1797–1868), et al. Each chapter is illustrated by a full-page engraving by the noted caricaturist Kenny Meadows (1790–1874). Meadows was a talented Welsh illustrator, wood-engraver and watercolorist, who had cooperated with the Cruikshanks in joint publications. This is among his best works. Although undated, the ads for sequels to H. B. Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” helps to date the issue at approximately 1855–60. It was originally published in 1840 (http://www.answers.com/topic/james-joseph-meadows?cat=entertainment). Uncommon. Hinges cracked. Wear at ends and edges of spine, edges and corners of boards. Slight toning of pages. Else, Very Good.
Price: $225.00

10753
Clarke, William and George Cruikshank.- Three Courses and a Dessert; Comprising Three Sets of Tales, West Country, Irish, and Legal; and a Melange. With Fifty Illustrations by George Cruikshank. London. George Bell & Sons. 1881. Wood engravings. full-page and inserted into text. Later Edition. 432 pp. + 30 pp. publisher’s ads in front and rear. 12mo. Green embossed publisher’s cloth. Gilt titling on spine. Cohn 144. Patten, George Cruikshank’s Life, Times, and Art, Vol. 1. “By far the most celebrated of Cruikshank’s early woodblock illustrations.… Clarke [1800–38] was an underemployed barrister – it is said he once had a client – who collected pothouse tales of West Country, Irish, and legal shenanigans. Possessing some aptitude for dialect and dialogue, he wrote these up and scribbled little comic design to accompany them.” (Patten, p. 329) Clarke had been a friend of Cruikshank since the mid-1820s and called on him to realize the visual expressions of his sketches. The volume was originally published in 1830 and was very successful. Cruikshank’s illustrations. both the tailpieces and the plates, are considered among the best of his career. Corner of leaf 21/22 off (present) without loss of text. Spine slightly sunned. M minimal wear at ends of spine. Else, Very Good.
Price: $210.00

10762
Blanchard, Laman (Editor).- George Cruikshank’s Omnibus. Illustrated with 100 Engravings on Steel and Wood., London. Tilt and Bogue. 1842. Copiously illustrated by George Cruikshank. Engraved cover of September, 1841 issue bound in as a frontispiece, along with grand madcap engraving of Preface and engraved portrait of George Cruikshank with bold facsimile signature as frontispieces. All plates with tissue guards. First Edition. 300 pp. 8vo. Green half-calf with marbled boards. Marbled end papers. Gilt ruling and titling. Hand sewn silk headbands. A.e.g. (heavily) Patten, Cruikshank, Vol. 2, especially pp. 175–183. Cohn 190. In 1841, Cruikshank became increasingly disenchanted with the publisher Bentley while working with Harrison Ainsworth illustrating his novels. Despite financial woes and the illness of his wife, Cruikshank separated from Bentley and became attached to secondary publishers like Tilt and Bogue. In May, 1841, he started Omnibus as his personal outlet. Laman Blanchard was the editor and Ainsworth the subeditor. Other authors include Merle, Marryat, Thackeray and "Bowman Tiller." It had the characteristic comic cover of the rear of a crowded omnibus pulling away. George drew the image and it was engraved by his nephew Percy Cruikshank, although George was angry with him for calling himself "Cruikshank the Younger."The contents are articles in a comic vein including a serialized novel and the miscellany entitled "Omnibus Chat." The leading article in the second issue is a satire on "The New Police Act," which forbad everything joyous and simple. Patten considers Cruikshank's illustrations of this article to be among his sharpest. The Omnibus was issued monthly for the rest of 1841 but lost money steadily, despite selling 6500–7000 copies. In 1842 , after only 9 issues, Cruikshank suspended The Omnibus, considering issuing it as an annual. This never happened, as he was consumed by debt, family problems and heavy drinking. Spine ends and corners worn. Else, Very Good.
Price: $400.00

5878
Mackenzie, Kenneth R. H. (Translator).- The Marvellous Adventures and Rare Conceits of Master Tyll Owlglass Newly Collected, Chronicled and Set Forth, in Our English Tongue, by Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. And Adorned with Many Most Diverting and Cunning Devices, by Alfred Crowquill. Boston. Ticknor & Fields. 1860. Illustrated by Alfred Crowquill [Alfred Henry Forrester, 1804–1872]. Seven full-page plates, six chromolithographed, with tissue guards and wood engravings inserted in text. First Edition Bound with the English sheets, red publisher’s cloth. Beveled boards. Gilt titling and decorations on spine. Wonderful gilt titling, and gilt illustration within elaborate gilt border on front cover. All edges gilt. Binder’s ticket on rear pastedown. The first American edition of the German classic, the medieval story of Tyll Eulenspiegel. The English translation is by Mackenzie and here the American edition is composed of English sheets. There are a bibliographc and scholarly appendices. Owner’s small name stamp on front free end paper. Both hinges starting internally (i.e., a modest cracking of end paper gutter). Spine worn at eds and edges with early transverse crack. Front cover and all else Very Good indeed.
Price: $375.00

10695
Seymour, Robert.- Sketches by Seymour. Three Volumes Bound in One. London. G. S. Tregear. [N.D. 1834–36] Illustrations by Robert Seymour. First Edition. 89 pp. 8vo. Half brown calf with marbled boards.Rebacked with bluish calf on 5 bands with gilt ruling and titling on spine.. Yellow patterned end papers. Edges of text block stained red. Everitt, “English Caricaturists”, esp. pp. 218–220. C. F. G. Schwerdt, “Hunting....”, II, 257–9. A series of humorous prints, mostly sporting, by Robert Seymour, each with brief text. Vol. 1 has 35 prints + cover, Vol. 2 has 36 prints + cover, Vol. 3 has 16 prints. The prints are rendered on colored paper, some pink, some blue-green and some tan. Seymour (1798–1836) was a noted humorous illustrator, famous for his caricatures and comic illustrations. he imitated George Cruikshank and for a while signed his work “Short Shanks”. He did copper engraving in the 1820’s and changed to lithography in the 1830’s. This edition of his “Sketches” was published by Tregear in 5 volumes. There were 5 etched titles, one for each of the volumes, and 180 etched plates. This volume contains about half the entire production. Schwerdt’s bibliography has detailed listing of this item, permitting an exact collation. Seymour was responsible for initiating with Chapman and Hall the idea for what became “The Pickwick Papers”. The little known Charles Dickens was hired to write the brief accompanying text. Dickens was aggressive in pursuing a larger role for the author. Seymour, a fragile personality, committed suicide after only 2 numbers of the serial publication were issued and Dickens rose to fame on what he remade of “The Pickwick Papers”. Gabriel Shear Tregear (1802-41) was active from 1820 to 1841; he published humorous and sporting prints from his print shop in Cheapside. He was the publisher also of I. Robert Cruikshank, George’s brother. Minimal foxing on blank free end papers. Wear at corners and edges of boards. Rebacked professionally.Else, Very Good.
Price: $1,200.00

10701
Taylor, John, Esq..- Monsieur Tonson. London. Marsh and Miller. 1830. Full page illustrations and a few small cuts. First Illustrated Edition. 19 pp. + 3 pp. publisher’s ads. 16mo. Tan printed and illustrated paper wraps. DNB for Taylor. John Taylor (1757–1832) was born into a family of oculists and himself served with his brother as oculist to King George III, a family tradition as three generations of oculisfts to the King. Fascinated by the stage, he became a popular author of political sketches, prologues, epilogues, addresses and poems. He was a journalist, owning The Morning Post, The True Briton and The Sun. He was also the author of this comic poem, Monsieur Tonson, (which was suggested by a prank of Thomas King, the actor) in 1808, an anti-French and anti-Catholic work, originally published for children in various formats, broadside and text. A dramatic version read by William Moncrieff was never performed at Drury Lane, as intended. However it drew crowds at the Freemasons’ Tavern. This edition was the first illustrated edition with illustrations by Robert Cruikshank. Wear at edges and corners of covers, with soiling, Loss of spine. Covers detached. Mild foxing, with one spot on pp. 12–16. Few light pencil markings. Else, Good.
Price: $110.00

10531
Cruikshank, George and Hone, William.- [Pamphlet]. “Non Mi Ricordo!” &c. &c. &c. London. William Hone. 1820. Illustrated with three wood engravings by George Cruuikshank. Thirtieth Edition (so stated). 16 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Cohn 606, Patten, Life, I69–86. This is one of a series of illustrated pamphlets which helped to make the career of George Cruikshank. In the period of 1819–20, Cruikshank, together with his publisher, William Hone, and the scold, William Cobbett, were heavily engaged in the scandal which overtook the new King George IV, formerly Regent to his mad father George III. A roué himself, Prince George was estranged from his wife, Queen Caroline, with an attempt to separation made while she was abroad. While she was likely adulterous herself, Cobbett, Hone and Cruikshank supported her against the corrupt government and published pamphlets in her support. In an event instigated by the King and his courtiers, a trial of the Queen was held for adultery. The witnesses against her were chiefly a group of Italians from Milan. One of the principal witnesses, in the act of perjury, kept reporting “No mi ricordo” (”I don’t remember”). This parody by Hone and Cruikshank helped mobilize the courts to the Queenite side and she was restored to rank and favor. There is some evidence that Cruikshank, who abruptly and promptly withdrew from the issue after the trial, had been bribed by the King to do so. William Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. A close friend of George Cruikshank, who was a moderate liberal as opposed to Radical, Hone had collaborated with Cruikshank on many political pamphlets, including that most incendiary and famous collaboration, "The Political House That Jack Built," which "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). Hone had been a friend of William Cobbett and, through him, Thomas Paine. Very Good.
Price: $295.00

10533
Cruikshank, I. R..- [Pamphlet]. The R----l Fowls; or, The Old Black Cock’s Attempt to Crow over His Illustrious Mate. A Poem London. Effingham Wilson. 1820. Illustrated with two wood engravings by I. R. Cruuikshank. Tenth Edition (so stated). 16 pp. 8vo. Disbound. Patten, Life, 45–6, I69–86. This pamphlet is illustrated by I. Robert Cruikshank (1789–1856), elder brother of George Cruikshank. In the period of 1819–20, George Cruikshank, together with his publisher, William Hone, and the scold, William Cobbett, were heavily engaged in the scandal which overtook the new King George IV, formerly Regent to his mad father George III. A roué himself, Prince George was estranged from his wife, Queen Caroline, with an attempt to separation made while she was abroad. While she was likely adulterous herself, Cobbett, Hone and Cruikshank supported her against the corrupt government and published pamphlets in her support. In an event instigated by the King and his courtiers, a trial of the Queen was held for adultery. The witnesses against her were chiefly a group of Italians from Milan. One of the principal witnesses, in the act of perjury, kept reporting “No mi ricordo” (”I don’t remember”). A parody by Hone and G.Cruikshank so-named, helped mobilize the courts to the Queenite side and she was restored to rank and favor. There is some evidence that George Cruikshank, who abruptly and promptly withdrew from the issue after the trial, had been bribed by the King to do so. This pamphlet, “The R----l Fowls” is Robert Cruikshank’s take on the story of George IV and Caroline. It is much milder than the vitriol published by his brother, but still a scarcely disguised attack on George IV and milder on Caroline. The back cover, illustrated by I. R. Cruikshank, is an ad for the pamphlet “A Peep at the P*V****N; or, Boiled Mutton with Caper Sauce at the Temple of Joss. A Satirical Poem.”, which appears to be another satire on George and Caroline. Robert had gone to sea as a midshipman at age 14 and was presumed lost at sea , only to reappear in 1806 at the family door. He abandoned then his naval career and rejoined his father and brother as caricaturists. He remained a Radical republican and an alcoholic throughout his life, while brother George had given up on both. Very Good.
Price: $295.00

10212
Crowquill, Alfred (pseudonym) [Alfred Henry Forrester].- A Bundle of Crowquills, Dropped by Alfred Crowquill, in His Eccentric Flights over the Fields of Literature. Sixteenth Thousand, Pages 245 pp. + 10 pp. publisher's catalogue.Small 8vo. Illustrated paper covered boards. Sixteenth Thousand, Frontispiece engraved by Dalziel and wood engravings in text by Crowquill, engraved by Lee. A collection of tales, comic drawings and commentary by Alfred Henry Forrester, whose pseudonym, Alfred Crowquill sometimes encompassed works by his brother, as well, until 1844. Crowquill illustrated several works of Charles Dickens and other contemporary literary luminaries, as well as his own work for "Bentley's Miscellany" and other publications. The comic verse is often very witty, especially "Owed to My Creditors" on p. 134. The preface consists of but two words: "Read it!" Worn at edges. Most of spine lost, with crude replacement by paper tape. Chips, especially at fore edges, from paper covering boards, involving mainly the margins of the illustrations. Front hinge cracked internally. Slightly shaken. Text block Very Good. London. G. Routledge & Co. 1854.
Price: $275.00

6619
Forrester , Alfred Henry (Alfred Crowqill).- Comic Arithmetic. First Edition. Pages 177 pp. + 3 pp. publisher's ads. 12mo. Rebound in blue cloth with gilt titling on spine. First Edition. Well Illustrated by Crowquill. Humorous anecdotes based on arithmetic and arithmetic operations. Forrester (1805-72) was an English humorist, both writer and artist. Until 1844, he worked illustrating his brother's (Charles Robert Forrester) writings. Among his works were: "The Tour of Dr. Syntax" (1838), "The Travels of Baron Munchausen" (1859) and "The Adventures of Master Owl-Glass," as well as work for "Punch," Bentley's "Miscellany," The Illustrated London News," etc. Very Good. London. Richard Bentley. 1844.
Price: $225.00

7980
The Brothers Mayhew.- 12 Plates and Title Page by George Cruikshank. Whom to Marry and How to Get Married! Or, the Adventures of a Lady in Search of a Good Husband. First Edition. Pages 271 pp.8vo. Full Calf with Gilt Filets on Both Covers, Internally and Externally, and Gilt Signature of Cruikshank on Front Cover. Rebacked with Pigskin (?) with a Worn Old Back Laid down, Curiously Unlikely to Be from This Volume, at Least Not Contemporary to the Covers. The Gilt Decorations on the Old Back Do Not Seem Appropriate to the Cover Gilding. The Back Panel with Authors' Names May Be from the Back, But the Title Panel Is Likely New. The Word "London," in the Blind, Is Faintly Made out at Tail of the New (Old) Spine. A.E.G. Ribbon Page Marker. First Edition. Patten, "Revaluation," and "George Cruikshank's Life Times and Art," II. A comical work by the Mayhews and George Cruikshank in a curiously updated binding. Cruikshank did not work for the upper class "Punch," but did work with "Punch" authors like the Mayhews. He patterned this volume of 1848 after "The Greatest Plague of Life" (1847), both books as illustrations of typical "Punch" jokes. The Cruikshank illustrations are much less sneering than the text by the Mayhews, who also edited his "Comic Almanac." In "Whom to Marry," the antecedent joke was the most popular ever published in "Punch"; an ad for home furnishings ran: "Worthy of Attention. Advice to Persons about to Marry, - Don't!" The volume came out in six monthly numbers, November, 1847 to March, 1848, in wraps. Cruikshank had an especially amicable relationship with his publisher, David Bogue, who had occasion to bail the artist out of jail when, around the year of this publication, Cruikshank again took to excessive drinking. Very Good. London. David Bogue. N.D. [1858]
Price: $425.00

9823
Cruikshank, George, and Hone, William.- The Political Showman - at Home! Exhibiting His Cabinet of Curiosities and Creatures - All Alive. By the Author of The Political House That Jack Built. With Twenty-Four Cuts. Third Edition. London. William Hone. 1821. Pages 32 pp. (unnumbered), including 3 pp. publisher's ads.8vo Disbound. Third Edition. Woodcut illustrations by George Cruikshank; text by William Hone. Cohn 668. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 157-9; Life, I, pp. 157-86. The comic illustrations are grand and selected by Louis James (in Patten, Revaluation, pp. 157 ff) to illustrate best Cruikshank's work during the Regency Period. The publisher and author of the text was William Hone, a noted champion of free speech who had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. A close friend of George Cruikshank, who was a moderate liberal as opposed to Radical, Hone had collaborated with Cruikshank on many political pamphlets, including that most incendiary and famous collaboration, "The Political House That Jack Built," which "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." Hone had been a friend of William Cobbett and, through him, Thomas Paine. Cruikshank had established himself "as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson." The illustrations in "The Political Showman - at Home" are considered among Cruikshank's best (Life, I, p.183) (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlets in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). This pamphletr continues Hone's and Cruikshank's battle for freedom of the press. Its origin is Cruikshank's painting on glass celebrating the acquittal in 1820 of Queen Caroline. The painting is illustrated on p. 5. An animated printing press is illustrated throughout the pamphlet. There is allegory, carefully worked out with innumerable allusions familiar to Regency socialites. It reaches for its conclusion with the image of the eye, traditionally the emblem of divine power and virtue, with a printing press at its iris. Two slight tears of 1-2 mm. at leading edge. Else Very Good +.
Price: $275.00

9822
Cruikshank, George, and Hone, William.- The Right Divine of Kings to Govern Wrong! By the Author of The Political House That Jack Built. First Edition. London. William Hone. 1821. Pages 60 pp.8vo Disbound. First Edition. Woodcut illustrations by George Cruikshank; text by Hone. Cohn 695. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 157-9; Life, I, pp. 157-86. The comic illustrations are grand, each followed by a quotation from William Shakspeare (sic!). The publisher and author of the text, which is chiefly in iambic pentameter, with copious annotations, was William Hone, a noted champion of free speech who had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. A close friend of George Cruikshank, who was a moderate liberal as opposed to Radical, Hone had collaborated with Cruikshank on many political pamphlets, including that most incendiary and famous collaboration, "The Political House That Jack Built," which "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." Hone had been a friend of William Cobbett and, through him, Thomas Paine. The text is derived from Daniel De Foe's 1706 "Jure Divino." Cruikshank had established himself "as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson." The illustrations in "The Right Divine of Kings to Govern Wrong" are considered among Cruikshank's best (Life, I, p.183) (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlets in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). The lead is a caricature of George IV being anointed with oil of steel amid instruments of war and torture, while the tail piece shows a creature fashioned out of such cannon, bombs and tools of torture. The latter was cited by the Examiner for its personification of Royalty in its excess. Slight foxing of page edges. Else Very Good +.
Price: $275.00

9707
Cruikshank, George.- George Cruikshank's Omnibus. No. VIII. December, 1841 London. Tilt & Bogue. Printed by Bradbury and Evans. 1841] 32 pp. + 2 pp. out of sequence + 4 pp. ads at front, 4 pp. ads at rear and a pink inserted ad for Hutton's Brandy at rear. Conforms to Cohn 190. Numerous comic illustrations by George Cruikshank. The classic Omnibus cover was engraved by George's nephew Percy Cruikshank. 8vo. Illustrated paper wraps with cover illustration of a crowded omnibus by Cruikshank. Sewn. First Edition. A single issue, the eighth (of 9), of George Cruikshank's Omnibus, pp. 233–264 + a 2 pp. cancel leaf from previous part No. VII , (pp. 199–200). In 1841, Cruikshank became increasingly disenchanted with the publisher Bentley while working with Harrison Ainsworth illustrating his novels. Despite financial woes and the illness of his wife, Cruikshank separated from Bentley and became attached to secondary publishers like Tilt and Bogue. In May, 1841, he started Omnibus as his personal outlet. Laman Blanchard was the editor and Ainsworth the subeditor. Other authors include Merle, Marryat, Thackeray and "Bowman Tiller." It has the characteristic comic cover of the rear of a crowded omnibus pulling away. George drew the image and it was engraved by his nephew Percy Cruikshank, although George was angry with him for calling himself "Cruikshank the Younger." Inside are articles in a comic vein includingthe miscellany entitled "Omnibus Chat." There is a witty article on Mrs. Toddles and a poem by Thackeray (Titmarsh). The lead article in this issue is on the fire at the Tower of London, with accomanying poem by Blanchard and a glowing review of the singer Adelaide Kemble [Bone], with full page portrait of her (not by Cruikshank) in the operatic role of Norma. .The Omnibus was issued monthly for the rest of 1841 but lost money steadily. Having lost £6 on the second Issue, No. II, despite selling 6500 copies, in 1842 , after only 9 issues, Cruikshank suspended The Omnibus, considering issuing it as an annual. This never happened, as he was consumed by debt, family problems and heavy drinking. Single issues of the Omnibus are quite uncommon. Lacks rear cover and half of spine.Soiling. Foxing of some illlustrations. Tissue guards retained. Else, Very Good. Patten, Cruikshank, Vol. 2, especially pp. 175–183. Cohn 190.
Price: $130.00

9690
Cruikshank, George.- [Pamphlet] The Green Bag: "A Dainty Dish to Set Before the King;" A Ballad of the Nineteenth Century, by the Author of "The Political A, Apple Pie." With Thirteen Cuts. London. J. Robins and Co.. 1820. 23 pp. + 1 p. publisher's ads. Thirteen illustrations by Cruikshank 8vo. Bound in stiff boards with marbled paper cover to boards and calf spine lettered in gilt. Sewn. First Edition. A satirical verse, first published in in 1820 in this true first edition, illustrated by George Cruikshank parodying a nursery rhyme, poking fun at King George IV, so recently crowned after his regency, his ministers and Queen Consort Caroline. Caroline had been estranged from George and, residing on the continent, she had had a paramour and had been vilified by the King's ministers, especially as she now planned to return from the continent and reclaim her position as Consort. The possible (but, by no means, certain) author of the anonymous text, William Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. A close friend of George Cruikshank, who was a moderate liberal as opposed to Radical, Hone had collaborated with Cruikshank on many political pamphlets, including that most incendiary and famous collaboration, "The Political House That Jack Built," which "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). Hone had been a friend of William Cobbett and, through him, Thomas Paine. Cruikshank, in "The Green Bag" (the usual wrapper of government papers) is moderate toward Caroline and the King. King George may have recently bribed Cruikshank, among others, to be less vitriolic in his criticism of him. The absence of Cruikshank's signature on the title page illustration testifies to this being the first edition. American bookseller's ticket laid down on rear pastedown. Very Good. Cohn 366. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 158, 159; Life, I, pp. 157–86.
Price: $350.00

9689
Cruikshank, George.- [Pamphlet] The Political House that Jack Built. With Thirteen Cuts. London. William Hone. 1820. 24 pp. + 1 p. publisher's ads. Thirteen illustrations by Cruikshank 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Forty-Ninth Edition. A satirical verse, first published in 1819, illustrated by George Cruikshank parodying the nursery rhyme, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. Also digs at Wellington. The comic illustrations are grand. Each verse headed by a quotation from William Cowper. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank established himself "as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson." Perhaps the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, it sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). This edition appears to have been reset when compared with the earliest editions. Front cover detached. Else, Very Good Cohn 663. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 158, 159; Life, I, pp. 157–68.
Price: $300.00

9723
[Cruikshank, Robert] Morton, Thomas.- A Cure for the Heartache: A Comedy, In Five Acts. By Thomas Morton, Esq. Printed from the Acting Copy, with Remarks, Biographical and Critical, to Which Are Added, a Description of the Costume, – Cast of Characters, Entrances and Exits, – Relative Positions of the Performers on the Stage, – and the Whole of the Stage Business. As Now Performed at the Theatres Royal, London. Embellished with a Fine wood Engraving by Mr. Bonner, from a Drawing Taken in the Theatre, by Mr. R. Cruikshank. London. John Cumberland. N.D. [ca. 1805-10]. 68 pp. 12mo. Leather spine and marbled paper covered boards. First Edition. Thomas Morton (1764?:–1838) was a prominent playwright in Dublin and London at the turn of the 18th–19th centuries. He wrote many comedies starring the great actors of his day, including Keane and Macready, friend of Charles Dickens. This comedy was first produced at Covent Garden and in Dublin in 1797. The manuscript is in the Huntington Library. This printing probably was done about the time of the stage production (ca.1805) and includes detailed stage directions and introductory remarks by a reviewer (the publisher ?), who comments on the difficulty of portrayal of some characters and decries the decline in acting skills of the time, adding to the production problems. At the end of the play, in ink in the owner's hand, is a couplet: "Tis you my generous Patrons, are the Cause / My Heart's impatient for your kind applause." [Isaac] Robert Cruikshank (1789–1856) was a sober person like his father, quiet and philosophical, in contrast with his younger brother and fellow caricaturist, George Cruikshank (1792–1878), who took after his Scots mother in being hot tempered, boisterous (and, early in his career, alcoholic). Robert early on gave up a life as a midshipman at sea, becoming, like his father and brother, a noted caricaturist and miniturist. He satirized social extravagances and urged English neutrality in the early 19th century. He became noted for drawing scenes from the theatre from real life, and this is an excellent example of this work.. Spine shows a bit of wear at head and tail. Boards worn at edges. Marbled paper abraded and boards folded. Pages slightly browned and mildly foxed. Owner's signature with flourishes ("J. N. Pritchard") in ink on front free end paper, on first page of "Remarks" and on first page of the text of the play . Else, Very Good. Camb. Biblio. Eng. Lit.. II, 477. Concise DNB. Jerrold, "Cruikshank."
Price: $275.00

9558
[Catalogue].- Catalogue of an Extensive Collection of Books Illustrated by the Late George Cruikshank, including Fine Copies of His Rarer Works, and also of an Important Series of His Caricatures, Being the Reserved Portion of the Well-Known Collection, Part of Which Was Sold at This House on the 15th May, 1876. Which Will be Sold by Auction by Messrs Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, Auctioneeers of Literary Property & Works Illustrative of the Fine Arts, at Their House, No. 13 Wellington Street, Strand, W.C. On Thursday, the 11th Day of April, 1878, at One O'Clock Precisely. London. J. Davy and Sons. 1878. 16 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. Disbound. First Edition. A fascinating catalogue of a large sale of Cruikshank items shortly after his death. It imparts an extaordinary flavor of his range, beyond the dryness of the catalogue by Cohn or similar works. Also in this auction is a small collection of caricatures by Gillray (sic!) and others. Spine separating. Else, Very Good.
Price: $250.00

9559
[Catalogue].- A Catalogue of a Selection from the Works of George Cruikshank, Extending over a Period of Upwards of Sixty Years (From 1799 to 1863,) Now Exhibiting at Exeter Hall, Consisting of Upwards of One Hundred Oil Paintings, Water-Colour Drawings, and Original Sketches; Together with Over A Thousand Proof Etchings, from His Most Popular Works, Caricatures, Scrap Books, Song Headings, &c.; and the Worship of Bacchus. Preface by George Cruikshank. London. William Tweedie 1863. 24 pp. 8vo. Printed paper wraps. Disbound. Third Edition. A fascinating catalogue of a large exhibit of Cruikshank items from 1863. It imparts an extaordinary flavor of his range, vastly beyond the dryness of the catalogue by Cohn or similar works. Some works described in extenso. In addition to the Preface by Cruikshank, there is a Postscript quoted from "The Bookseller" of December, [1862], reviewing this exhibition and evaluating Cruikshank, the artist and the man. Cover slightly soiled. Else, Very Good.
Price: $260.00

9665
Cruikshank, George.- [Pamphlet] The Political House that Jack Built. With Thirteen Cuts. London. William Hone. 1819. 24 pp. Thirteen illustrations by Cruikshank 8vo. Self wraps. Sewn. Eighth Edition (same year as First Edition). A satirical verse illustrated by George Cruikshank parodying the nursery rhyme, poking fun at political leaders and self-important professions dedicated to the stifling of liberty and suppression of a free press. Also digs at Wellington. The comic illustrations are grand. Each verse headed by a quotation from William Cowper. The author of the text and publisher, Hone, was a noted champion of free speech and had been tried and acquitted three times in 1817 for political parodies of religious forms. In this "incendiary" pamphlet, Cruikshank established himself "as the leading caricaturist of the day in succession to Gillray and Rowlandson." Perhaps the most famous pamphlet by Hone and Cruikshank, it sold 100.000 copies, a new edition coming out almost daily, and "inspired a minor subliterature of imitation and riposte." (quotations from Patten whose treatment of the pamphlet in "Life, Times, and Art" is brilliant). Shaken slightly. Else, Very Good Cohn 663. Patten, Revaluation, pp. 3, 158, 159; Life, I, pp. 157–68.
Price: $350.00

6342
Blanchard, Laman (Editor).- George Cruikshank’s Omnibus. Illustrated with 100 Engravings on Steel and Wood., London. Tilt and Bogue. 1842. 300 pp. Copiously illustrated by Geprge Cruikshank. 8vo. Green half-calf with cloth covered boards. Gilt ruling and titling. A.e.g. First Edition. Signed in spectacular flyleaf dedication by Cruikshank. In 1841, Cruikshank became increasingly disenchanted with the publisher Bentley while working with Harrison Ainsworth illustrating his novels. Despite financial woes and the illness of his wife, Cruikshank separated from Bentley and became attached to secondary publishers like Tilt and Bogue. In May, 1841, he started Omnibus as his personal outlet. Laman Blanchard was the editor and Ainsworth the subeditor. Other authors include Merle, Marryat, Thackeray and "Bowman Tiller." It had the characteristic comic cover of the rear of a crowded omnibus pulling away. George drew the image and it was engraved by his nephew Percy Cruikshank, although George was angry with him for calling himself "Cruikshank the Younger."The contents are articles in a comic vein including a serialized novel and the miscellany entitled "Omnibus Chat." The leading article in the second issue is a satire on "The New Police Act," which forbad everything joyous and simple. Patten considers Cruikshank's illustrations of this article to be among his sharpest. The Omnibus was issued monthly for the rest of 1841 but lost money steadily, despite selling 6500–7000 copies. In 1842 , after only 9 issues, Cruikshank suspended The Omnibus, considering issing it as an annual. This never happened, as he was consumed by debt, family problems and heavy drinking. Fragile binding with front hinge separating. Spine and corners worn. Browning of edges of some illustrations. Else, Very Good. Patten, Cruikshank, Vol. 2, especially pp. 175–183. Cohn 190.
Price: $1,200.00

9471
Cruikshank, George.- George Cruikshank's Omnibus. No. II. June, 1841 London. Tilt & Bogue. 1841. 64 pp. + 6 pp. ads at front. Numerous comic illustrations by George Cruikshank. The classic Omnibus cover was engraved by George's nephew Percy Cruikshank. 8vo. Illustrated paper wraps with cover illustration of an omnibus by Cruikshank. First Edition. A single issue, the second, of George Cruikshank's Omnibus. In 1841, Cruikshank became increasingly disenchanted with the publisher Bentley while working with Harrison Ainsworth illustrating his novels. Despite financial woes and the illness of his wife, Cruikshank separated from Bentley and became attached to secondary publishers like Tilt and Bogue. In May, 1841, he started Omnibus as his personal outlet. Laman Blanchard was the editor and Ainsworth the subeditor. Other authors include Merle, Marryat, Thackeray and "Bowman Tiller." It has the characteristic comic cover of the rear of a crowded omnibus pulling away. George drew the image and it was engraved by his nephew Percy Cruikshank, although George was angry with him for calling himself "Cruikshank the Younger." Inside are articles in a comic vein including a serialized novel and the miscellany entitled "Omnibus Chat." The leading article in this issue is a satire on "The New Police Act," which forbad everything joyous and simple. Patten considers Cruikshank's illustrations of this article to be among his sharpest. The Omnibus was issued monthly for the rest of 1841 but lost money steadily. He lost £6 on this Issue, No. II, despite selling 6500 copies. In 1842 , after only 9 issues, Cruikshank suspended The Omnibus, considering issuing it as an annual. This never happened, as he was consumed by debt, family problems and heavy drinking. Single issues of the Omnibus are quite uncommon. Lacks rear cover and most of spine. Chips from edges. Foxing of illlustrations. Else, Very Good. Patten, Cruikshank, Vol. 2, especially pp. 175–183. Cohn 190.
Price: $130.00

9171
9171 Anonymous.-The Cruikshank Fairy-Book. Four Famous Stories. I. Puss in Boots. II. Jack and the Bean-Stalk. III. Hop-O'-My Thumb. IV. Cinderella. With Forty Illustrations By George Cruikshank. New York. G. P. Putnam's Sons. N.D. 216 pp. + 6 pp. publisher's catalogue. 8vo. Illustrated yellow cloth. A.e.g. Cohn 196–9 In its original edition, Cruikshank's Fairy Library was published in four parts, the first three by David Bogue in 1853–4, and the last ("Puss in Boots") in 1864 by Routledge, Warne & Routledge. The parts were brought together with all the illustrations for this Yellowback edition late in the century.An appendix addresses children encouraging the reading of classical moral tales. An added appendix addressed to parents includes Cruikshank's response to Charles Dickens, who had attacked him in "Household Words" with his article entitled "Frauds on the Fairies." Cruikshank attacks the cruelty, violence and especially the intemperance of many version of fairy tales and denies their worth as instruments of moral education. He is especially here, as ever, opposed to alcoholic beverages and their widespread use and abuse. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Covers soiled. Foxing. Mildly shaken. Hinges crcking internally. Else, Good.
Price: $75.00

9053
[Combe, William] and Crowquill, Alfred (psedonym for Alfred Henry Forrester).- The Tour of Doctor Syntax in Search of the Picturesque; Illustrated with Original Designs by Alfred Crowquill. London. Ackermann and Co. 1838. 361 pp. + 18 pp. publisher's ads. 8vo. Illustrated brown publisher's cloth with gilt illustrations on front cover and spine. Covers embossed in the blind. A.e.g. First Edition with Crowquill illustrations. Illustrated with wood engravings. Cushing, I, 429–430. Concise Dict. Natl. Biog. The epic comic poem by Combe, originally made famous by the illustrations by Thomas Rowlandson, here redone by the original publisher with "more modern" Crowquill illustrations. The original text followed the course of the illustrations, much as Robert Seymour had considered in 1836 for "the Pickwick Papers," which he had begun with the very young Charles Dickens. Crowquill(1805–1872) was a prolific contemporary of George Cruikshank and many of his illustrations appear in "Punch," "Illustrated London News," Bentley's Miscellany and in independent publications as well as in reinterpretations of Dickens, Albert Smith and other authors. In the period 1827–1844, he often illustrated the written works of his brother Charles Robert Forrester (1803–1850), both aspects under the nameof "Alfred Crowquill." Later Alfred became both author and illustrator. Professionally rebacked with original spine laid down. Wear at corners. Else, Very Good+.
Price: $400.00

9189
Cruikshank, George.- Scraps and Sketches. N.P. N.P. N.D. (ca. 1885). 26 pp. Oblong Fo. Grey cloth covered beveled boards with black titling and a gilt illustration of "Tell Tale" on the front cover. blue coated end papers. Cohn 180. Patten, Revaluation. Originally published privately by George Cruikshank in 4 annual parts, from 1828 to 1832, Scraps and Sketches contained six pages per issue with multiple comic designs on each page. Over the years Cruikshank promised new parts but, after a beginning, was unable to complete the projected series. The project, from the first edition on, was supported by advertising on the covers. This issue, a later production, probably dating from about 1885, also contains advertising, which is helpful in dating it. The title page provides no information on publisher, place of publication or date. Patten notes that Jerrold was the first to recognize that this work "may be said to furnish the pictorial material for the first attempt at illustrated journalism." Furthermore, "The Gin Shop," a "grim commentary on the evils of drink," presages "Cruikshank's eventual espousal of the cause of teetotalism." (Patten, 14). Some of the illustrations are visual and verbal puns, or metaphors; this interdependence of the verbal and the visual isdistinctive of Cruikshank's wit and his appeal (Patten, 94–95). Wear on edges of spine and at corners. Some soiling of covers. Hinges reinforced with tape internally. Else, Very Good.
Price: $185.00

9183
[Forrester, Alfred Henry]. (pseudonym: Alfred Crowquill).- Strange Surprising Adventures of the Venerable Gooroo Simple, and His Five Disciples, Noodle, Doodle, Wiseacre, Zany, and Foozle. Adorned with Fifty Illustrations, Drawn on Wood, by Alfred Crowquill. London. Trübner & Co. 1861. 223 pp. Small 8vo. Near contemporary three quarters light brown morocco and green cloth covered boards. Marbled end papers. T.e.g. Title page printed in red and black. Ribbon place marker. Labeled on end paper: "Bound by Root & Son." First Edition. Colored frontispiece and fifty black and white illustrations. Cushing, I, pp.429–30. Concise DNB. Forrester (1805–72) was an English humorist, both writer and artist. Until 1844, he worked illustrating his brother's (Charles Robert Forrester) writings. Among his works were: "The Tour of Dr. Syntax" (1838), "The Travels of Baron Munchausen" (1859) and "The Adventures of Master Owl-Glass," as well as work for "Punch," Bentley's "Miscellany," the " Illustrated London News," etc. Possibly, some of the nomenclature here (especially Noodle, Doodle and Foozle) was adapted from Charles Dickens' fanciful inventions and political satirizations in his recently published "Bleak House." It is also possible that the name of Gooroo was adapted from Mrs. Jellyby's Borrioboola from Borrioboola-Gha, also from "Bleak House." Even the typeface here appears to be a spoof of earlier 18th century formats. Owner's signature on half title: "William H Greenough." Old bookseller's invoice tucked in (wormed on blank lower third. Minimal abrasion at ends of spine. Few spots on cloth covers. Else, Very Good+.
Price: $375.00

9284
[Hindley, Charles].- Gallery of Comicalities, Embracing Humorous Sketches by the Brothers Robert and George Cruikshank, Robert Seymour, and Others. Special Edition on Parchment. London. Reeves and Turner. N.D. [ca. 1870] 147 leaves + publisher's ads, colophon and frontispieces. Small 4to. Tan publisher's cloth with printed paper label on spine and on front cover. First Edition in this format.Every page illustrated by George or Robert Cruikshank, Robert Seymour, or other comic artists of the period. First Edition in this format. Frontispiece portrait of George Cruikshank. Includes R. Cruikshank's "Illustrations of the Drama," " Steamers v. Stages;"Seymour's "The Drunkard's Progress" and "The Pugilist's Progress;" George Cruikshank's "Illustrations of Time," " Mornings at Bow Street," Illustrations of Phrenology;" others by Sears and various others including "A Drop of Gin" and odes to other forms of alcohol, "Monkeyana or the Gambler's Progress." Also present are a series of caricatures of Blacks from America with paeans to Jim Crow, dialect verse, etc. Every illustration with text printed on parchment. A handsome collection. Slight wear at edges of spine.Soiling of covers and front cover label. Wear and soiling of spine label. Else, Very Good, especially the text block and illustrations.
Price: $450.00

9186
Seymour, Robert and Cruikshank, Robert (Illustrators).- The Odd Volume; or, Book of Variety; Illustrated by Two Odd Fellows,- Robert Seymour and Robert Cruikshank. The Engravings by Samuel Slader. London. W. Kidd. N.D. [? 1836]. 348 pp .12mo in 6's Brown embossed publisher's cloth with gilt caricatures and lettering on spine. Yellow end papers. First Edition? Heavily illustrated, probably by both Robert Seymour and Robert Cruikshank. Not in Cohn, Patten, George Cruikshank's Life, or Patten's Revaluation. A series of comic anecdotes illustrated with plates, generally wood engravings.Since it is by Robert Seymour, the work was originally published in or prior to 1836, when Seymour died suddenly (suicide) during work on "The Pickwick Papers" with Charles Dickens. These anecdotes illustrated with a single plate conform to Seymour's usual mode of publication with the text viewed as hack work, perhaps not worthy of attribution. Most of the illustrations are more consistent with Seymour's work than with Cruikshank's. They lack the lighter, more Hogarthian touch of Cruikshank's work. The preface to "The Odd Volume" states that it was to be the fourth volume of the series, but the intention was changed because the Cruikshank brothers were then arguing over their relative skills and Mr. Seymour, an even more skillful artist (though lesser known because of his recent arrival in London), had to be brought in. Patten points out (Cruikshank, Life, I) that Seymour had parodied Cruikshank and briefly borrowed his name (as "Shortshanks") in 1827 until Cruikshank complained vehemently. On the other hand, Robert Cruikshank likely was involved in a collaboration with Seymour. Among the articles is a gem on how to tie a cravat. The final article is a parody of the Phrenology of Dr. Gall, and is likely a very early work on this subject. Elegant nautical bookplate of George Duncan on front pastedown. Wear at hinges, corners and ends of spine, which shows 1–2 cm loss at each end. Hinges cracked.Page edges slightly browned. Unfoxed with crisp illustrations. Else, Very Good for such a fragile item.
Price: $300.00

9192
Wright, Thomas.- Caricature History of the Georges. Or, Annals of the House of Hanover. Compiled from the Squibs, Broadsides, Window Pictures, Lampoons, and Pictorial Caricatures of the Time. With Nearly Four Hundred Illustrations on Steel and Wood. London. John Camden Hotten N.D. [1869]. 639 pp. + 24 pp. publisher's catalogue at rear, dated 1869. 6to. Green publisher's cloth with gilt illustration and titling on front cover and spine. Blue coated end papers. A.e.g. ? First Edition. Colored frontispiece by John Gillray and many other illustrations; twelve other plates, engraved by Fairholt. Oxford Comp. Eng. Lit., 3rd, p. 862. Camb. Biblio. Eng. Lit., III, 890–2. A survey of and commentary on English caricature, mostly of the eighteenth and nineteenth century. In all a discourse on English social and political history of the Georgian era, as revealed in caricature. Much information on Gillray, Hogarth, Rowlandson, et al. Wright (1810–77) was educated at Cambridge, helped found the Camden and Percy Societies dedicated to early English history and ballads, and wrote copiously on these subjects. Preface dated December, 1867. Publisher's catalogue presents new works for 1869. Originally written in 1848 under the title "England under the House of Hanover", this title represents a revision of 1868, also later reissued in 1876. Much wear at ends of spine. Rear hinge cracking externally and both hinges cracked internally. Front hinge taped at end papers. Shaken with taping at pp. 192/3. Browning of page edges. Bookseller's blind embossing on front free end paper. As usual, overall, Poor, but text itself is Good.
Price: $85.00

8699
8699 Cruikshank, George.- [Engraving]. "The Rights of Women" or The Effects of Female Enfranchisement. London. David Bogue. 1853. Literature Pages 1 p.6 1/2" x 15 3/4" Extracted from "The Comic Almanack" for 1853. Folded engraving mounted on card. First Edition. Cohn, 184. A telling cartoon by George Cruikshank arguing for female enfranchisement. A large crowd of both men and women stand on the side of the platform holding The Ladies Candidate, while few voters stand on the side of The Gentleman's Candidate. The supporters of women's rights are suave, beauteous and animated, bearing flowers and smiles, with a Knight Errant whose armor bears the emblem of Love rides amongst them. The opponents are glum, angry appearing, bored and jealous. A strong statement by the eminent 19th Century cartoonist who often stood for social justice and reform. This cartoon was originally published as the folded fronispiece of Cruikshank's Comic Almanack for 1853 and has been removed and mounted on card. Some cracking at original folds without loss. Moderate staining and scant foxing, but principally a bright, clear copy. Overall, Good.
Price: $125.00

8868
8868 Cruikshank, George (Illustrator) .- The Comic Almanack. An Ephemeris in Jest and Earnest, Containing Merry Tales, Humorous Poetry, Quips and Oddities. By Thackeray, Albert Smith, Gilbert A Backett, The Brothers Mayhew. With Many Hundred Illustrations by George Cruikshank and Other Artists. Second Series, 1844-1853. London. John Camden Hotten. N.D. [1871]. Humor Pages 428 pp. + 28 pp publisher's catalogue for 1871 bound in.8vo. Green publisher's cloth with gilt illustration and titling on front cover and spine. First Edition. Large fold-out frontispiece and numerous illustrations. Cohn 184 (First Publication). Patten, Cruikshank's Life, Vol. II. John Cameron Hotten, a publisher of the best to the risqué, according to Patten, rescued Cruikshank's Comic Almanack (and other works) from the archives of David Bogue, republishing it ca. 1871 and providing needed royalties to the artist, then somewhat out of favor. Hotten also defended and promoted Cruikshank against the hostile John Forster, then at work on his great but one-sided biography of Dickens. Slight wear at tail and edges.of spine. Hnges starting internally. Slightly shaken. Else, a Very Good and clean copy of a fragile item.
Price: $175.00

8685
Leech, John.- Pictures of Life and Character. From the Collection of Mr. Punch. New York. D. Appleton & Co. 1884. Pages 92 pp. + 4 pp. Publisher's Ads.4 1/2" x 5 7/8" Parchment paper covered paper wraps. First American Edition. Illustrations by John Leech.The Parchment-Paper Series. Wonderful comic illustrations of humor in British life and sport by the master illustrator, John Leech. Very well reproduced in this posthumous volume on the work for "Punch" by one of England's best illustrators and Dickens' selection for "A Christmas Carol." A good sample of the work of the illustrator of "Comic History of England" and "Comic History of Rome." A selection rarely seen in this smaller format in 19th Century wraps. Faint water stain at the edge of later pages. Minimal foxing. Covers lightly soiled. Else, Very Good.
Price: $75.00

8869
Seymour, Robert (Illustrator).- Cruikshank at Home: A New Family Album of Endless Entertainment. Heavily illustrated, likely entirely by Seymour. Numerous Illustrations Engraved on Wood. Third Series. & The Odd Volume; or, Book of Variety; Illustrated by Two Odd Fellows,- Seymour and Cruikshank. London. Henry G. Bohn. 1845. Pages 316, 348 pp.Small 8vo. Red embossed publisher's cloth with gilt caricatures and lettering on spine. yellow end papers. First Edition? Not in Cohn, Patten, Cruikshank's Life, or Patten's Revaluation. A series of comic anecdotes illustrated with plates, generally wood engravings. If by Robert Seymour, the work was originally published prior to 1836, when Seymour died suddenly (suicide) during work on "The Pickwick Papers" with Charles Dickens. These anecdotes illustrated with a single plate conform to Seymour's usual mode of publication with the text viewed as hack work, perhaps not worthy of attribution. In the first volume, the illustrations are more consistent with Seymour's work than with Cruikshank's. They lack the lighter, more Hogarthian touch of Cruikshank's work. Nowhere is the work of "Cruikshank at Home" ascribed to or signed by George Cruikshank, contrary to his custom after about 1815. This volume is labeled "Third Series". It is unlikely that there ever was a First or Second Series. The preface to "The Odd Volume" states that it was to be the fourth volume of the series, but the intention was changed because the Cruikshank brothers were then arguing over their relative skills and Mr. Seymour, an even more skillful artist (though lesser known because of his recent arrival in London), had to be brought in. Patten points out (Cruikshank, Life, I) that Seymour had parodied Cruikshank and briefly tborrowed his name (as "Shortshanks") in 1827 until Cruikshank complained vehemently. The publisher, Henry Bohn, was known as a publisher of remainders; accordingly it is possible that these volumes, labeled 1845, were composed of the original sheets from an earlier publication, which, if by Seymour, they had to be. The final article is a parody of Phrenology of Dr. Gall, and is likely a very early work on this subject. Modest wear at hinges and edges of spine. Hinges starting internally. Else, Very Good. Unfoxed with crisp illustrations.
Price: $300.00

8924
Seymour, Robert (Illustrator), and Sheridan, Louisa Henrietta (Editor).- The Comic Offering; or Ladies' Melange of Literary Mirth, for MDCCCXXXI. London. Smith, Elder and Co. 1831. Pages 351 pp.12mo in 6's. Embossed publisher's cloth with gilt decoration and titling on spine. A.e.g. First Edition. Profusely illustrated by Robert Seymour and possibly others. Several engravers. Faxon 88. A variety of comic verse, essays and stories, presumably written for ladies, with numerous comic illustrations. Many of the illustrations are identified, by signature or by style, as by Robert Seymour, best known as the original illustrator of "The Pickwick Papers." Especially good are the frontispiece and title pages, both by Seymour. The "Editor," not further identified, nor listed in Todd, apologizes for the first issue of her projected annual production which lasted for 5 consecutive years . A nice copy of a fragile and very rare item, noted for the Seymour contribution. Front hinge cracked with spine loosened on rear hinge. Small chips from spine. Corners bumped. Minimal foxing and soiling. Lacks front free end paper. Shaken. illustrations Near Fine. Else, Good to Very Good.
Price: $175.00

8410
Jerrold, Blanchard.- The Life of George Cruikshank in Two Epochs. London. Chatto & Windus. 1894. 392 pp. Illustrated from Cruikshank's work. 8vo. Blue publisher's cloth, decorated. Pages untrimmed. Second Edition (A New Edition with Eighty-Four Illustrations). The one volume edition of Jerrold's classic biography of Cruikshank, reissued. Dedicated by the author to Gustave Doré, who had contributed a drawing (still included) to the first edition of this volume. Moderate wear at head and tail of spine and atcorners of covers. Else, Very Good.
Price: $135.00

8286
Cruikshank, George.- The Comic Almanack. An Ephemeris in Jest and Earnest, Containing Merry Tales, Humorous Poetry, Quips, and Oddities. By Thackeray, Albert Smith, Gilbert À Beckett, The Brothers Mayhew. With Many Hundred Illustrations by George Cruikshank and Other Artists. First Series, 1835–1843. London. John Camden Hotten. 1871. 388 pp. + Publ. Catalogue 8vo. Green Publisher's Cloth with Gilt Lettering and Decoration. First Edition, as Such. Cruikshank's wonderful Miscellany, republished by Hotten in this somewhat fragile form near the end of Cruikshank's long life. Wear at ends of spine and corners. Minimal foxing. Shaken. Front hinge starting internally.
Price: $140.00

6167
à Beckett, Gilbert Abbott.- The Comic Blackstone. Chicago. Callaghan & Cockcroft. 1869. First American Edition. Illustrated by George Cruikshank. An important ante-fire Chicago imprint. Hinge cracked with separation of one edge of spine. American Imprints Inventory, No. 4, Ante-Fire Chicago, 1427.
Price: $165.00

8626
Anstey, Christopher.- The New Bath Guide; or Memoirs of the B-N-R-D Family, in a Series of Poetical Epistles: A New Edition:j with a Biographical and Topographical Preface and Anecdotal Annotations by John Britton, F.S.A. and Member of Several Other Societies. Embellished with Engravings. George Cruikshank engravings. London. Hurst, Chance & Co. 1830. 176 pp. + 4 pp. publisher's ads. 8vo. Purple binder's cloth.Leather label on spine with gilt lettering. Binder's ticket on rear pastedown: "W. Smith, Bookbinder. Ivy Lane." First Edition. Frontispiece and Title Drawn and Engraved on wood by S.Williams. Five Full Page Etchings Drawn and Engraved by George Cruikshank. A series of etchings by George Cruikshank, which Patten (Cruikshank's Life, Times and Art, I,338) finds "rather delightful if routine." They were done at an early time when Cruikshank was trying to establish himself as a serious artist and reformer, but was driven to lesser commissions in order to survive personally and as an artist. The drawings have all the freshness and wit of the early Cruikshank and do not descend to his advertising art (albeit popular) for Warren's Blacking, where 10 years earlier Charles Dickens was pasting labels onto containers. These drawings for the Guide to Bath (originally published in 1766 and, afterwards, the most profitable book ever published by Dodsley) help to document the end of the Regency Period in England. Cruikshank's own merry visit to Bath is described with wit and sympathy by his friend, W. L. Sammons, in Blanchard Jerrold's classic biography. Anstey (1724–1805), a minor poet and Cambridge scholar, lived in Bath, from 1770 till his death in 1805. This is a very crisp and wonderful copy despite the faults with the binding. Front hinge split. Fading of cloth. 1 cm. stain on front cover. Leather spine label probably added late. Wear at ends of spine. Minimal foxing. Owner's signature on front pastedown: "Marion S. Jennings." Despite these faults, easily repaired, this is a Very Good copy. Cohn, 34. Jerrold, "Life of George Cruikshank in Two Epochs," Ch. XIII. Concise Dict. Natl. Biography. Beeton, Dict. Universal Biography.
Price: $300.00

8638
Gore, Mrs. [Catherine Grace Francis].- The Inundation; or, Pardon and Peace. A Christmas Story. Illustrated by George Cruikshank. New York. Kiggins & Kellogg, Publishers. N.D. 222 pp. Small 8vo. Pressed publisher's cloth with gilt titling and decoration of spine. First American Edition. Frontispiece engraving , unsigned, probably by George Cruikshank. Mrs. Gore (1799–1861) was the author of 70 works, including novels ("Manners of the Day," "Mrs. Armytage," "The Banker's Wife," etc.; plays, "School for Coquettes," "Lords and Commons," "Quid pro Quo" (the latter parodied by Thackeray in "Novels by Eminent Hands"); music for favorite songs like "And Ye Shall Walk in Silk Attire." On front free endpaper is inscription: "To Hattie / From her friend / Sara / Dec 25th, 1864." This novel was originally published in 1847–8. The original English publication, also undated, calls for four steel etchings by Cruikshank for this last of Mrs. Gore's three consecutive Christmas annuals, 1845–7, at a low point in Cruikshank's career, when he was unwanted and the only jobs he turned down were alcohol-related. This American edition lacks the three plates in the text at pp. 70, 166 and 196 (and appear never to have had them), but contains the frontispiece vignette, presumably by Cruikshank, and what appears to be a cancel title page with the type face naming the publisher different from that of the main body of text of the title page, still calling for engravings by Cruikshank. The text block is still 222 pp., as in the English original published by Fisher. Possibly a piracy. Spine gilt nearly gone.. Ends of spine and corners worn. Water stains at tail of block. Mild foxing. Front hinge split nearly asunder . Shaken. A Fair to Good copy with a Good frontispiece. Concise Dictionary of National Biography. R. F. Sharp, Dict. of English Authors, pp.115–6. Camb. Biblio. Eng. Lit., III, 396–8. Cohn, 358. Patten, V. 2, 263.
Price: $110.00

7980
The Brothers Mayhew.- Whom to Marry and How to Get Married! Or, the Adventures of a Lady in Search of a Good Husband. London. David Bogue. N.D. [1858] 271 pp. 8vo. Full Calf with Gilt Filets on Both Covers, Internally and Externally, and Gilt Signature of Cruikshank on Front Cover. Rebacked with Pigskin (?) with a Worn Old Back Laid down, Curiously Unlikely to Be from This Volume, at Least Not Contemporary to the Covers. The Gilt Decorations on the Old Back Do Not Seem Appropriate to the Cover Gilding. The Back Panel with Authors' Names May Be from the Back, But the Title Panel Is Likely New. The Word "London," in the Blind, Is Faintly Made out at Tail of the New (Old) Spine. A.E.G. Ribbon Page Marker. First Edition. 12 Plates and Title Page by George Cruikshank. A comical work by the Mayhews and George Cruikshank in a curiously updated binding. Cruikshank did not work for the upper class "Punch," but did work with "Punch" authors like the Mayhews. He patterned this volume of 1848 after "The Greatest Plague of Life" (1847), both books as illustrations of typical "Punch" jokes. The Cruikshank illustrations are much less sneering than the text by the Mayhews, who also edited his "Comic Almanac." In "Whom to Marry," the antecedent joke was the most popular ever published in "Punch"; an ad for home furnishings ran: "Worthy of Attention. Advice to Persons about to Marry, – Don't!" The volume came out in six monthly numbers, November, 1847 to March, 1848, in wraps. Cruikshank had an especially amicable relationship with his publisher, David Bogue, who had occasion to bail the artist out of jail when, around the year of this publication, Cruikshank again took to excessive drinking. Very Good. Patten, "Revaluation," and "George Cruikshank's Life Times and Art," II.
Price: $425.00


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